Culture and Customs of Croatia

By Marilyn Cvitanic | Go to book overview

10
Painting and Sculpture

ANCIENT ART IN A CONTEMPORARY CONTEXT

Contemporary life in Croatia is imbued with history. Just as centuries-old buildings are a vital part of Croatian culture, so too are the paintings and sculptures housed in timeworn churches and other historical structures. This section highlights the most relevant historical of works of art before moving on to a more detailed presentation of the paintings and sculpture of the last 150 years.

One of the oldest sculptures found in Croatia is the Vucedol Dove, an artifact of the Vucedol culture, which existed in the vicinity of modern-day Vukovar during the transitional period between the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Created between 2800 and 2500 BCE, scholars believe that this birdshaped clay vessel was used in fertility rituals and perhaps represents a male partridge, a common fertility symbol of the period. The piece stands 7.7 inches (19.5 centimeters) high with several mysterious symbols engraved on its body, including three double axes and a necklace of sorts. It is covered with linear designs that appear to function simply as decoration. The relevance of this figure lies not only in its elegance and visual power but in its symbolic representation of the Vucedol culture, which was one of the most advanced civilizations in the region, having been credited by scholars with inventing one of the oldest European calendars. The figure captured the imagination of modern-day Croatians when it served as a symbol for peace in the town of

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Culture and Customs of Croatia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • 1 - Geography and History 1
  • 2 - Religion 43
  • 3 - Civic Values and Political Thought 51
  • 4 - Marriage and Family, Gender Issues, and Education 65
  • 5 - Holidays and Leisure Activities 77
  • 6 - Cuisine and Fashion 91
  • 7 - Literature 107
  • 8 - Media and Cinema 127
  • 9 - Music and Performing Arts 141
  • 10 - Painting and Sculpture 167
  • 11 - Architecture and Housing 193
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 241
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