The Middle Class Fights Back: How Progressive Movements Can Restore Democracy in America

By Brian D’Agostino | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Government for the People

INTRODUCTION

According to planetary science, physical conditions necessary for life— which may be a rarity in our universe—are likely to exist on earth for another billion years, after which increased radiation from the sun will wipe out our biosphere (Caldeira and Kasting 1992). From a human perspective, a billion years is an eternity. But environmental crises created by humans, if not reversed in the current decade, will likely destroy billions of human lives through starvation, dehydration, disease, and political violence within the life span of babies being born today or, at the latest, of their children.1

As adults, this generation—or, rather, the part of it that survives this hell of ecological collapse—will live on a barren planet stripped of hundreds of thousands of species that took the last half a billion years to evolve. Nature will not make an exception for America, as the extreme weather events currently decimating agriculture worldwide attest. Entire regions that are growing grains today will be unsuitable for farming, and the remaining humans will live in a continual state of war over the arable land and potable water that remain (Brown 2009; Klare 2002; Wright 2004). Those miserable people—our children and grandchildren—will be struggling for physical survival, not worrying about repaying government debt.

1. Such are the consequences of large scale destruction of agriculture that will be caused by catastrophic climate change, which is imminent and can only be averted, if at all, by emergency action (Brown 2009; Harvey 2011; Klare 2002; Richardson et al. 2009; Wright 2004).

-97-

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The Middle Class Fights Back: How Progressive Movements Can Restore Democracy in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part I- How the Rich Rule 1
  • Chapter 1- The National Security Scam 3
  • Chapter 2- The Attack on Wages and Benifits 29
  • Chapter 3- School Reform and Other Diversions 55
  • Chapter 4- The Attack on Goverment 83
  • Part II- A New Progressive Agenda 95
  • Chapter 5- Government for the People 97
  • Chapter 6- Markets without Capitalism 129
  • Chapter 7- Unleashing Minds and Brains 143
  • Chapter 8- Renewing Democracy 159
  • Appendix Psychology of Radical Right 169
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 197
  • About the Author 205
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