Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians

By Robert E. Shore-Goss; Thomas Bohache et al. | Go to book overview

1
Faithful to a Very Queer-Acting
God, Who Is Always
Up to Something New

Robin H. Gorsline

I remember the first time someone said to me, “God is gay.” I quickly agreed, believing then, as I do now, that God incorporates all sexualities and genders. It did not seem like a big deal to me, although I know it did for others.

But even more I remember the first time it dawned on me that God might be queer—or if we don’t want to name God that way, at least that God acts queer. That was, and I believe is, a big deal.

The moment involved my teaching a class at MCC Richmond using the United Methodist curriculum, Disciple, a comprehensive, biblical, and relatively traditional, resource. I do not recall how the subject came up, but I do remember that the group became very engaged in discussing marriage. I mentioned the struggle MCC General Conferences has had over the years in debating whether to remove the requirement from our movement bylaws that Holy Unions are only to be granted to two people.

Several participants expressed their unease with the idea, while several others indicated their agreement. I observed that I had known several triads who seemed to navigate life together relatively well. At that, another participant—a very committed member and leader—broke through all the quiet, tentative talk with a ringing declaration, “If you, Pastor Robin, or MCC, ever bless one of those ‘unions‘[appropriate facial expressions and gestures indicating a judgment that not only do they not constitute holyunions, but also they are not unions at all] I am out of here! No questions, no discussion, no looking back!”

-33-

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