Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians

By Robert E. Shore-Goss; Thomas Bohache et al. | Go to book overview

4
The Transgendered Christ

Megan More

Throughout my life, I have been searching for a religious community, a church home, where I could feel free in my own self-awareness and understanding of who I was. Throughout my youth and young adulthood, this was seriously lacking. I always felt at odds, not with God or Christ, but in the doctrines of churches which were exclusive and limiting in who they felt worthy or acceptable within their church families and walls. If you didn’t fit their standards of piety or behavior, or mold yourself to their image of what was proper or normal, you couldn’t belong. I rebelled against this concept, always believing in my heart that this was not Jesus’ way, and that God created each of our souls as intended for a purpose and worthy of God’s love, no matter how diverse we are.

My own personal journey in both my faith and social life has been fraught with many stumbling blocks, some of which were of my own making in an effort to conform to the wishes of others, who I later discovered didn’t have the same concern for my social, emotional, or spiritual welfare. It was in my great effort to preserve what I had, and thought I loved, and loved me, is what led to my own epiphany. I learned that if you can’t be honest with yourself, and honestly love who and what you are, you can never make another person truly happy. This awareness of life was a major renewal of my love of God and Christ, and an increased awareness of Christ’s role for all of humanity, and especially the transgendered individuals around the world. For Christ to truly be all things for all people, especially in the resurrection, that ideal of the transformation,

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