Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians

By Robert E. Shore-Goss; Thomas Bohache et al. | Go to book overview

Part II
OPENING THE
BODY OF CHRIST

Thomas Bohache

The essays contained in Part I demonstrate that an important part of Queering Christianityis to explore radically inclusive images of God. In order for Christianity to be properly queered, God’s very self must be queered so that we may dream beyond the narrow confines of heteronormativity. God is not the only concept or Being that must be queered, however. From its inception, the Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) has insisted on a radical (re)development of what it means to be church.

Elsewhere I have suggested that the Queer Movement might be the new Pentecost1 : If Pentecost was the day when the Holy Spirit blew the doors off of the first Christians’ comfortable domicile and forced them out into the streets to gather others, speaking to them in their own languages, then in the same way today’s queer theologizing and church-making blows the doors off the Church universal and urges its congregants to move outward, to open up, and embrace all people in their own languages, idioms, cultures, and lifestyles. This is a further type of inclusivity that goes beyond discussion of who God is; it gets to the very heart of Christianity, for it examines who is entitled to worship that radically inclusive God. MCC has been on the forefront of this type of inclusivity, and the eight essays that comprise Part II describe eight different ways of thinking about this dimension of inclusivity.

Scripture calls the Christian community “the Body of Christ.” Indeed, St. Paul suggested to the church at Corinth that their gatherings should be inclusive because each member of the Body of Christ has a function that makes it essential to the whole (1 Cor. 12:12–27), while to the Galatians

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