Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians

By Robert E. Shore-Goss; Thomas Bohache et al. | Go to book overview

9
Beyond the Open Table:
Rachelle Brown

Rachelle Brown

In the later part of the 20th century, Metropolitan Community Churches (MCC) offered a bridge between LGBT persons and Christianity by offering Communion to all regardless of membership, confessional affiliation, or official profession of Christianity.1 Liturgical and theological openness at the moment of Communion, explored in other forms of American religion, continues to expand across the globe.2 Each week, a variety of persons participate in open communion within MCC or in other worshipping communities. Openness in participation at the Communion table is a small, yet extremely significant portion of the larger Christian sacramental history. Due to this tangible reality, one can rightly ask: Does the open table as practiced within MCC worship automatically equal a queer Communion? The answer is both yes and no. Yes, because various persons and identities converge at the open table, transgressing boundaries in ways unparalleled in modern Christian practice. The answer is also no, for the reason that when LGBT and queer persons participate, the rite or practice does not become queer by association. Consider this question: If predominately heterosexual persons practice an open communion that includes LGBT persons, is the practice queer theologically because LGBT persons are present? Once again, the answer is no because a person’s orientation or gender does not mean that person is living in a way that is queer.

These questions illuminate the need for a queer critique and theological exploration of Communion. As with any regular practice, and especially because Communion is a central Christian rite, a closer critique reveals

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.