Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians

By Robert E. Shore-Goss; Thomas Bohache et al. | Go to book overview

Queer Lectio Divina

Mona West

In his book, Lectio Divina: Renewing the Ancient Practice of Praying the Scriptures, Father Basil Pennington suggests,

The Word was made flesh. Jesus is the most complete expression of the
Word in our creation. God is a Word. God is communication. And we
therefore are essentially a listening, a listening for that Word. To the extent
we truly “hear” that Word, receive that Word into our being and into our
lives we participate in the Divine Being, Life, Love, Joy. Made in the image
of God, we have an unlimited, and infinite potential to be like unto him.
Each of us is a certain listening, a certain openness to being, to reality,
to communication. Everything that has been a part of our lives since the
moment of our creation has had its role in shaping the listening that we are
舰 it is good for us to realize that we are a certain, definable listening. It is
as though my listening has a certain physical shape to it.1

As I read this quote and as I ponder the importance of scripture in the lives of LGBT folk, the following questions arise: “How do LGBT people who have been told that scripture calls us an ‘abomination’ truly hear and receive the Word of God into our being, into our lives so that we might participate in the ‘Divine Being, Life, Love, Joy?’ How might LGBT people of faith enter into the kind of listening that embraces the power of scripture for spiritual formation?”

While each of us may be a unique listening for God in the words of scripture, the Bible has also been interpreted by groups of people with certain kinds of power and belief systems in ways that have resulted in the

-371-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.