Index
About the House. 18
“Address for a Prize Day,” 33–35, 128
Adelphi, 131
Adonais, 105. 163
Adrian in The Sea and the Mirror, 78
Age of Anxiety, The. 64, 65, 98: desire and, 145, 151–52; “The Dirge” in, 149, 150–51; ending of, 153; fantasy and reality in, 69; feeling and sensation in, 152; inwardness and, 145; language in, 146; “The Masque” in, 149, 151, 152; play-acting in, 93; religion and, 153; renewal of Auden’s religious faith expressed in, 116; role of Emble in, 141, 152, 154, 155; role of Malin in, 141–42, 149, 153, 155, 156, 157, 158, 167; role of Quant in, 141, 142–43, 144, 155–56; role of Rosetta in, 141, 145, 146, 147, 153, 154, 155; romanticism and, 147–48; “The Seven Ages” in 141–42, 144, 145, 146, 148; sources for, 141, 151; story line of, 140–41; symbol of the cross in, 156
Airman in The Orators: character of the, 123; creation of the, 122; dream of the, 127; enemies of the, 124; homosexuality and the, 127; organization and the, 123–24; psychosomatic ailments of the, 126–27; sensation and mind and the, 124
Alastor, 158
“Alexander’s Feast,” 174
Alienation effect, 71
Allendale, 8
Alliterative phrases, Hopkins and, 56
All the Conspirators, 18
Alonso in The Sea and the Mirror, 41–42, 78
America: Auden’s emigration to, 49–50, 115; revisions made in, 115
American Review, 124
American Scholar, 145
Another Time, 47
Anouilh, Jean, 96
Anthropomorphization, 64
Antipoet: art and the, 23, 24; Auden as, 25; benefits of the, 27; comedy and the, 26; description of the, 21, 22–23; optimists and the, 27; role of speakers and, 28. See also Speakers)
Antonio in The Sea and the Mirror: ability to control reality, 77; compared to Prospero, 40; first speech of, 78; style of, 73–74; views of an and life expressed by, 72
Anxiety and Kierkegaard, 140
Anxiety of Influence, The, 138
“Archaeology,” 117
“Argument, The,” in The Orators, 32, 128–29
Ariel in The Sea and the Mirror. 79, 80, 81, 86, 88
Arnold, Matthew, 57, 142
Art, Christian theory of, 174–75
Art and life, relation of, 18, 22–23, 24, 63:
in The Sea and the Mirror, 44–45, 71, 72, 75, 77, 82–83
Artificiality in The Sea and the Mirror, 71, 73, 84–85
Ascent of F6, The, 13, 118
“As Our Might Lessens,” 132
Auden, Wystan Hugh: as a Bard, 163; as a child, 7, 15; compared to Brecht, 113; compared to Byron, 3; compared to

-187-

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W.H. Auden
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Modern Critical Views ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Some Notes on the Early Poetry 7
  • Auden at Sixty 13
  • The Pattern of Personae 21
  • Auden after the Thirties 47
  • Auden, Hopkins, and the Poetry of Reticence 55
  • Only Critics Can’t Play 63
  • Artifice and Self-Consciousness in the Sea and the Mirror 69
  • An Oracle Turned Jester 91
  • The Rake’s Progress- An Operatic Version of Pastoral 101
  • Auden’s Revision of Modernism 111
  • The Orators- Portraits of the Artist in the Thirties 121
  • The Romantic Tradition in the Age of Anxiety 135
  • Disenchantment with Yeats- From Singing-Master to Ogre 161
  • Chronology 177
  • Contributors 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Acknowledgments 185
  • Index 187
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