Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants

By Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis; Stacey L. Bowers et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Project Design

When the proposal development team completes a thorough planning process, a fundamentally sound project design is likely to result. Project design begins with consensus building, continues through the identification of ideas and concepts, and concludes with the drafting of a project goal, objectives (also called service programs), and activities. The team should take the time that is needed to make participants aware of the process.

Novice grant-seeking teams have a tendency to rush into the design stage without a clearly defined need or a projected solution. The predictable result is a disjointed array of ideas that do not adequately address target audience needs. When a group of individuals come together to write a grant proposal (also called a proposal), achieving a clear project goal may be difficult until they evolve into a team. The representatives of partner institutions must not be enabled to preoccupy themselves with “hidden agendas” rather than collaborative decision-making.

Based upon the existing feedback, the Principal Investigator must be able to determine whether the proposal development process is progressing or lagging behind the prepared timetable. If the Principal Investigator cannot refocus team efforts around a shared project goal, the participants will maintain their rigid postures on a host of issues. These “hidden agendas” may include unrelated, new services for students, faculty, and parents; involvement with emerging and experimental technologies; equipment “shopping” for pilot sites located within their agencies; and, professional development opportunities. Selected individuals may want to divide the anticipated grant funds equally among the institutions rather than share

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Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part 1 - Grant Development 1
  • Chapter 1 - Planning- The Core of Proposal Development 3
  • Chapter 2 - Project Design 41
  • Chapter 3 - Project Narrative 65
  • Chapter 4 - Project Personnel 85
  • Chapter 5 - Project Evaluation 101
  • Chapter 6 - Budget Development 141
  • Chapter 7 - Appendices 167
  • Part 2 - Implementation and Management 183
  • Chapter 8 - After the Proposal 185
  • Chapter 9 - Implementing the Project 195
  • Chapter 10 - Managing the Project Day-to-Day 225
  • Chapter 11 - Project Accountability 253
  • Chapter 12 - Project Closeout 289
  • Glossary of Grant Terms 291
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 305
  • About the Authors 315
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