Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants

By Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis; Stacey L. Bowers et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Project Narrative

The project narrative is a detailed explanation of the proposed project. Sections typically include the problem to be addressed, the proposed solution, the target audience to be served, the expected outcomes and benefits, a detailed evaluation plan, brief descriptions of key personnel, and basic descriptions of the applicant and its partner agencies. The time and effort required to draft a grant proposal provides a forum for team members to explore research-based, validated research findings; identify “best practices”; develop new ideas; better understand challenges in the learning community; and strengthen established relationships with partner groups, academic institutions, and community-based organizations.

Writing a successful grant proposal with a strong potential to be funded is within the capabilities of most librarians. Success depends on developing a well-conceived program plan (see Chapter 1); properly researching potential funding entities; focusing the proposal to fit the mutual interests of the library and the potential grantor; and putting together a comprehensive proposal package.

Grant writers need be aware of the varying types of proposals that can be requested, especially in those cases where the potential grantor designates a preference. Potential grantors may specify that requests take the form of a letter of intent, a letter proposal, or comprehensive proposal. Regardless of the type of document requested, the content does not vary significantly. Each of these proposal types is described briefly.

The letter of intent, generally two pages or less in length, is used when the potential grantor requests a concise thumbnail sketch of the project. This short document enables the grantor’s staff to evaluate the project before

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Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part 1 - Grant Development 1
  • Chapter 1 - Planning- The Core of Proposal Development 3
  • Chapter 2 - Project Design 41
  • Chapter 3 - Project Narrative 65
  • Chapter 4 - Project Personnel 85
  • Chapter 5 - Project Evaluation 101
  • Chapter 6 - Budget Development 141
  • Chapter 7 - Appendices 167
  • Part 2 - Implementation and Management 183
  • Chapter 8 - After the Proposal 185
  • Chapter 9 - Implementing the Project 195
  • Chapter 10 - Managing the Project Day-to-Day 225
  • Chapter 11 - Project Accountability 253
  • Chapter 12 - Project Closeout 289
  • Glossary of Grant Terms 291
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 305
  • About the Authors 315
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