Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants

By Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis; Stacey L. Bowers et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
Implementing the Project

Congratulations! Your project has been funded. You did your homework, chose a great team, planned well, and wrote a winning proposal. While it may seem like the end of a long road, receiving funding is only a first step.

Implementing and managing a funded project require substantial effort and major commitments of time and resources. Management includes activities such as overseeing project implementation, planning and organization, hiring and managing personnel, marketing, record-keeping, financial oversight, accounting, reporting, and evaluation. Management also often includes a fair amount of political positioning, deal-making, and outright wrangling within an organization. Luckily, most organizations have protocols and procedures in place to aid in many management functions. Some may even have a person or office to provide assistance.

The Principal Investigator (Project Director) is ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of the project or program. Successful grant management begins with this individual. Effective Principal Investigators possess excellent communication skills, attention to detail, and the drive to ensure that all project obligations are met on time and as promised. Effective Principal Investigators are also leaders. They lead by example and know how to build a team. However, they also know that they cannot do the job alone, and they delegate responsibility to meet the demands of competing obligations.


GETTING STARTED: CELEBRATE, PRAISE,
AND COMMUNICATE

Winning a grant is a major accomplishment. Planning and drafting a funded proposal is no small task. Receiving funding for an important project

-195-

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Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part 1 - Grant Development 1
  • Chapter 1 - Planning- The Core of Proposal Development 3
  • Chapter 2 - Project Design 41
  • Chapter 3 - Project Narrative 65
  • Chapter 4 - Project Personnel 85
  • Chapter 5 - Project Evaluation 101
  • Chapter 6 - Budget Development 141
  • Chapter 7 - Appendices 167
  • Part 2 - Implementation and Management 183
  • Chapter 8 - After the Proposal 185
  • Chapter 9 - Implementing the Project 195
  • Chapter 10 - Managing the Project Day-to-Day 225
  • Chapter 11 - Project Accountability 253
  • Chapter 12 - Project Closeout 289
  • Glossary of Grant Terms 291
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 305
  • About the Authors 315
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