Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants

By Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis; Stacey L. Bowers et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Managing the Project Day-to-Day

Smooth project operations are the result of good planning and organization. When careful planning and organization are incorporated into the proposal phase, implementation becomes a procedural rather than an allencompassing process. The parameters of every project or program are set forth in the grant proposal. Therefore, planning and organizational activities should originate from the obligations and requirements set out in that document. A thorough knowledge of all project obligations is critical to project implementation and management.


ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE: THE BIG PICTURE

Every project needs an organizational structure. An organizational structure defines the lines of authority and the relationships between project components. Grant-funded projects typically include management, budget, and evaluation components. Other common components include marketing, staffing, and strategic planning. A line of authority is simply another way of saying who reports to whom.

The Principal Investigator (Project Director) may be responsible for all project components in a very small project (see Table 10.1). He or she may also be the top line of authority. However, for most projects a number of people with varied levels of authority will be involved. For example, at a college or university the departmental finance director may oversee day-to-day account entries while larger budgetary decisions are made by higher level university officials. Similarly, the departmental finance director may send monthly reports to the Principal Investigator who may then report to the

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Librarian's Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part 1 - Grant Development 1
  • Chapter 1 - Planning- The Core of Proposal Development 3
  • Chapter 2 - Project Design 41
  • Chapter 3 - Project Narrative 65
  • Chapter 4 - Project Personnel 85
  • Chapter 5 - Project Evaluation 101
  • Chapter 6 - Budget Development 141
  • Chapter 7 - Appendices 167
  • Part 2 - Implementation and Management 183
  • Chapter 8 - After the Proposal 185
  • Chapter 9 - Implementing the Project 195
  • Chapter 10 - Managing the Project Day-to-Day 225
  • Chapter 11 - Project Accountability 253
  • Chapter 12 - Project Closeout 289
  • Glossary of Grant Terms 291
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 305
  • About the Authors 315
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