The Future of Truth and Freedom in the Global Village: Modernism and the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century

By Thomas R. McFaul | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have reviewed this book, in whole or in part, and have been generous in offering suggestions for improvement. In alphabetical order, these are Wendell Bell, Peter Bishop, Edward Cornish, Jib Fowles, Michel Laurent, Tim Morris, John E. Wade II, and Morris Westerhold. One name in particular stands at the top of the list, physicist Al Brunsting, who reviewed the entire manuscript. In particular, his thoughtful insights into the evolution and current status of modern science added depth to chapters 4 and 5. He is also largely responsible for the figures that appear throughout the book. I owe him a debt of gratitude.

After nearly 40 years of college teaching, I have learned that some of my best teachers have been my students. Their tough questions and constructive suggestions have withstood the test of time and in no small way helped shape many of the ideas that appear throughout this book. Lastly, special thanks go to my family for their continuous encouragement. Their loving support knows no end. If any shortcomings appear in the following pages, they rest entirely on my shoulders.

-xiii-

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The Future of Truth and Freedom in the Global Village: Modernism and the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 - At the Starting Line 1
  • Chapter 2 - Running the Long Race 7
  • Chapter 3 - Pushing the Polarities 29
  • Chapter 4 - The Butterfly 43
  • Chapter 5 - Roaming around in the House 65
  • Chapter 6 - Inside the Big Machine 83
  • Chapter 7 - A Common Thread 103
  • Chapter 8 - Bulging Pockets 121
  • Chapter 9 - Fifty Plus One 139
  • Chapter 10 - Heading into the Future 157
  • Index 183
  • About the Author 191
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