Health, Medicine, and Society in Victorian England

By Mary Wilson Carpenter | Go to book overview

7

Blindness

Thus with the year
Seasons return; but not to me returns
Day, or the sweet approach of eve or morn,
Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer’s rose
Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine;
But cloud instead, and ever-during dark
Surround me, from the cheerful ways of men
Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair
Presented with a universal blank
Of Nature’s works, to me expunged and rased,
And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.1

These lines from Paradise Lost, the epic poem written by the great seventeenth-century English poet John Milton, appear in the pages of the British medical journal the Lancet, in October 1825, in the first lecture on “the anatomy, physiology, and diseases of the eye” written by William Lawrence of the London Ophthalmic Infirmary. “Even our great poet,” the surgeon comments, always refers to his own blindness “in a tone of anguish and despondency.” And although it is perhaps surprising to find that one with such a “highly-gifted mind, and the exhaustless stores of knowledge with which it was furnished,” might be despondent about blindness, for others it is only to be expected.

Loss of sight is the greatest misfortune even to the rich, who can alle-
viate it by purchasing the aid and services of others. How much more
severely must it be felt by the poor, by the middle and lower classes

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health, Medicine, and Society in Victorian England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chronology xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Practitioners and Patients in Victorian England 9
  • 2 - Cholera 34
  • 3 - Tuberculosis 54
  • 5 - Smallpox 91
  • 6 - Deafness 108
  • 7 - Blindness 128
  • 8 - Victorian Women as Patients and Practitioners 149
  • Glossary 177
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 203
  • About the Author 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.