Global Security Watch--Lebanon: A Reference Handbook

By David S. Sorenson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
The Modern History of Lebanon

There are few places in the world that have a more storied history than does Lebanon. It was the home of the ancient Phoenicians, and the word “Bible” may come from the Lebanese city of Byblos (which is Greek for “papyrus,” the material on which early sacred books were published). Its history goes back much further, to Neolithic peoples who inhabited Lebanon as early as 50,000 BCE,1 and it has marched on steadily, but not without tragedy and violent conflict. Modern Lebanon is a child of that tragic but rich history.2


LEBANON’S EARLY HISTORY

It is difficult to know exactly what early peoples populated Lebanon, but the Canaanites were probably the first to leave behind writings that allowed a window into their history. They may have arrived as early as 4,000 BCE, taking advantage of Lebanon’s rich alluvial soil to raise crops and its natural harbors to start seafaring. The Hyksos came next, using Lebanon to invade their neighbors, sweeping into Egypt in the second millennia BCE, until Egypt finally drove them out after centuries of rule. Egyptian forces would later do battle with the Hittites, who came to Lebanon from modern Turkey, at one point doing battle with Rameses II at a remote place called Kadish; though the details of the conflict are vague, Rameses decorated his mortuary temple with depictions of Hittite severed body parts as symbols of Egypt’s victory over them.

According to some legends, the Greeks referred to Lebanon’s Canaanites as “Phoenicians” from a Greek word for crimson, referring to the purple dye extracted from the murex mollusks that the Phoenicians used to color their

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Security Watch--Lebanon: A Reference Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Modern History of Lebanon 7
  • Chapter 2 - The Demographics of Lebanon 49
  • Chapter 3 - Political and Economic Development in Lebanon 69
  • Chapter 4 - Hezbollah in Lebanon 103
  • Chapter 5 - The Lebanese Regional Neighborhood 121
  • Chapter 6 - Lebanon’s Military Forces 135
  • Chapter 7 - The United States and Lebanon 145
  • Epilogue 157
  • Appendix A - Biographies 161
  • Appendix B - Chronology 169
  • Appendix C - Documents 171
  • Appendix D - Presidents and Prime Ministers of Lebanon 187
  • Glossary 191
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 197
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.