The Nobel Peace Prize: What Nobel Really Wanted

By Fredrik S. Heffermehl | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
AFTER WORLD WAR II: POLITICS
DISTORTING THE PRIZE

LAWMAKERS MUST RESPECT THE LAW

To make a will is to make up one’s mind, but a testator is free to change his or her mind at any time. Death, however, makes the will final and fixed. A bequest for the eradication of leprosy must be used against leprosy. If at a later point leprosy is eliminated, it will be possible, with proper public approval, to use the funds for a new purpose, for example, the eradication of tuberculosis. No one has approved a change to Nobel’s will. The scourge of war has not been eradicated; the target of the testament has not been reached. The military has not been abolished; instead the world seems caught in a destructive pattern that too many take for granted and see no escape route from.

Chapter 4 laid bare the steep decline in loyalty to Nobel. After World War II, with a new and broad political consensus in favor of military, the prize ceased to be a tool to promote peace politics. Possible explanations have to do with organization, individuals, and a change in the general climate in Norway regarding security policy.

In 1897, the testament of Nobel was a sensation. The claims from the family made it urgent to get the Nobel Foundation established; there was no time to lose and little time to consider matters of principle, responsibility, and the potential consequences. In addition, the options were restricted: If the Parliament of Norway had refused, not only the Peace Prize but also the other Nobel prizes could have failed to come into existence.

The idea of tasking a Parliament with the implementation of a will may have been typical of the innovative and unconventional mind of

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Nobel Peace Prize: What Nobel Really Wanted
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.