Shades of Blue and Gray: An Introductory Military History of the Civil War

By Herman Hattaway | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My sweet and brilliant wife, Margaret, has ever been my most precious and treasured collaborator—in all things.

Numerous persons have been kind enough to read all, or some portion, of this work in its various drafts and to give me suggestions for improvement. These folk include my previous collaborators, whose insight and judgment I value highly: Archer Jones and Richard E. Beringer. Other colleagues in the history profession who did welcome, insightful, and helpful critiques were Gary Gallagher, Richard McMurry, Richard Sommers, Dan Sutherland, Russell Weigley, and Tommy R. Young II.

Three dear friends from the Kansas City Civil War Round Table were of immense help: the late Milton Perry, who knew so much about the Civil War’s “infernal machines”; retired colonel John Mahan Brooks, a collateral descendant of the famous West Point professor Dennis Hart Mahan; and my attorney, Stephen D. Treaster, who knows at least a little bit about almost everything!

Several cadets, and former cadets, of the U.S. Military Academy gave me special insights that could come from no other source. I recall with special fondness the twenty-one cadets who studied History of the Modern Military Art under my direction and the fifty-seven cadets who studied with me the Military History of the American Civil War. Detailed critiques of an earlier version of this work were prepared by Paul E. Begalka, Robert L. Bennett, Matthew Bukovac, Chris Jenks, Michael R. Spears, Anthony J” Russillio Jr., and Kevin M. Tohill.

Four students in a colloquium in military history at the University of Missouri-Kansas City suffered through a semester of agonizing work with me, during the fall of 1991, and prepared helpful formal critiques of a very early version of this book: Larry G. Gray, Travis W. Scott, James Underwood, and Rebecca Willis.

A subsequent colloquium, during the fall of 1994, did the same thing on a more mature version of the typescript. I especially thank three outstanding members of that group for tremendously insightful and helpful suggestions: Patrick Osborn, one of the best master’s degree students ever; Ethan Rafuse,

-xi-

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