Shades of Blue and Gray: An Introductory Military History of the Civil War

By Herman Hattaway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
A Rival Displaces McClellan;
and a Second Chance

A graduate of West Point, class of 1842, who had served in the Mexican War, Pope appeared competent. The truth, though not so immediately evident, was this: Pope was a genuinely good general officer but out of his element in army command.

A new (and destined to be short -lived) Army of Virginia was formed for him on June 26, 1862, the same day that Robert E. Lee had initiated the Seven Days campaign. Numbering initially about forty-seven thousand men, the new army had three corps.

“I have come to you from the West,” Pope grandiloquently proclaimed, “where we have always seen the backs of our enemies.” Pope’s phraseology did not go over well, and it earned him much enmity, especially among the numerous McClellan partisans, one of whom remarked that Pope “has now written himself down [as J what the military world has long known, an ass.” Samuel Sturgis, another McClellan partisan, not long after this himself delivered what would become the most famous of all utterances about Pope: “I don’t care for John Pope a pinch of owl dung.” Another critic opined that “If John Pope possessed a coat of arms, it would have been bombast rampant upon an expansive field of incompetence.” Nevertheless, what Pope had said was true; he was facing problems of demoralization, and he was genuinely trying to boost morale.

Between July 18 and 25, 1862, Pope issued four general orders that spelled out the government’s new harder approach to warfare. His army would “subsist upon the country,” and Rebels would feel the pinch of deprivation. Further, Rebel civilians would be “held responsible” if Union supply or communication lines were hampered or if unconventional attacks were made upon army

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shades of Blue and Gray: An Introductory Military History of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 281

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.