The Depression Dilemmas of Rural Iowa, 1929-1933

By Lisa L. Ossian | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
POLICY
Prohibition Possibly Prohibited:
Voicing Temperance Concerns

Some day historians will taste of the prohi-
bition pottage cooked on our present political
cook stove, smack their lips and tell our grand-
children or great grandchildren students exactly
what the recipe was and how it could have been
improved had their forefathers (ourselves) not
been so utterly blind and woefully stupid.

Prohibition is with us cloaked in a garb that
is angel white or smeary with awful grime
according to the kind of glasses one is peering
through.

—Fred A. Hinrichsen, Davenport, Iowa (1930)

Mrs. Albert G. Ossian, president of a local Women’s Christian Temperance Union, delivered a short talk at the annual reception for the school faculty in Stanton on November 7, 1929. Mrs. Ossian (or Bessie) welcomed the teachers and explained the “Scientific Temperance Instruction” that the WCTU followed for school essay and poster contests. Another WCTU member, Mrs. Marie Ossian, then served the two-course luncheon. Three teenagers from the young people’s branch (Misses Elva Ossian, Florence Anderson, and Marveline Reed) passed the plates while the forty-five members of this local chapter entertained their guests with renditions of pop songs.

And so continued a long tradition of local, state, and national participation of the still-active WCTU in 1929, almost a decade since the passage

-135-

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