Hiroshima: The World's Bomb

By Andrew J. Rotter | Go to book overview

Praise for Hiroshima

‘An engaging and exceptionally skillful combination of the scientific, technological, military, diplomatic, political, and cultural history of the atomic bomb in an international context. By any standard, a terrific book.’

J. Samuel Walker, author of Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan

‘In a smart, useful, and beautifully written book, Rotter treats the atomic bombing of Japan in its multinational context. Synthesizing a huge literature, he concisely shows in how many ways this truly was the world’s bomb.’

Laura Hein, Northwestern University, and author of Living with the Bomb

‘A profound look at one of mankind’s most significant (and tragic) events… diplomats and their politician bosses should read this work for an understanding of the dire outcomes that diplomacy—and a lack thereof— can reap.’

Thomas W. Zeiler, University of Colorado, and author of Unconditional Defeat: Japan, America, and the End of World War II

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Hiroshima: The World's Bomb
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Making of the Modern World ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Praise for Hiroshima vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • Introduction - The World’s Bomb 1
  • One - The World’s Atom 7
  • Two - Great Britain- Refugees, Air Power, and the Possibility of the Bomb 31
  • Three - Japan and Germany- Paths Not Taken 59
  • Four - The United States I- Imagining and Building the Bomb 88
  • Five - The United States II- Using the Bomb 127
  • Six - Japan- The Atomic Bombs and War’s End 177
  • Seven - The Soviet Union- The Bomb and the Cold War 228
  • Eight - The World’s Bomb 270
  • Epilogue - Nightmares and Hopes 304
  • Notes 310
  • Bibliographical Essay 340
  • Credits 356
  • Index 357
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