Hiroshima: The World's Bomb

By Andrew J. Rotter | Go to book overview

Plates

1. Ernest Rutherford: A New Zealander who came to the United Kingdom in 1895, Rutherford was one of the pioneers of modern nuclear physics

2. Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn, in their laboratory at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute outside Berlin, 1938

3. Ernest Lawrence, Enrico Fermi, and Isidor Rabi: Three physicists who played important roles in the development of the first nuclear weapons

4. A US government propaganda poster, “Lookout Monks!”: Throughout the war, the British and American governments encouraged citizens to imagine the destruction of Germany and Japan by bombers

5. Johann Strasse, central Dresden, 1945: American and British air forces bombed the German city of Dresden on the night of 14–15 February, 1945

6. Yoshio Nishina’s cyclotron, built at Tokyo’s Riken Laboratory

7. Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer: Groves was made a general and put in charge of the top-secret Manhattan Project in September 1942

8. The Americans destroy a German “uranium burner”

9. The Japanese emperor, Hirohito, walks through Tokyo neighborhoods wrecked by American bombs

10. Unloading the plutonium core of the Trinity test gadget, July 1945

11. The “Big Three” at Potsdam, July 1945: The Soviet Union’s Josef Stalin, US President Harry S. Truman, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill came together at Potsdam

12. Ruined Hiroshima: The atomic bomb codenamed “Little Boy” struck near the heart of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945

13. The bombed, 1: The living in Hiroshima sought shelter where they could find it

14. The bombed, 2: A family at a makeshift hospital ward

15. Standing at attention: A boy stands erect, having done his duty by bringing his dead brother to a cremation ground

16. No handshake for a hated enemy: The Americans ordered the Japanese to send a surrender delegation to Manila

17. Yuli Khariton and Igor Kurchatov: The two physicists most responsible for the creation of the Soviet atomic bomb program in the 1940s

18. The Indian reactor at Trombay: The CIRUS reactor, built with Canadian help and supplied with moderating heavy water by the United States, came online in 1960

-xi-

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Hiroshima: The World's Bomb
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Making of the Modern World ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Praise for Hiroshima vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • Introduction - The World’s Bomb 1
  • One - The World’s Atom 7
  • Two - Great Britain- Refugees, Air Power, and the Possibility of the Bomb 31
  • Three - Japan and Germany- Paths Not Taken 59
  • Four - The United States I- Imagining and Building the Bomb 88
  • Five - The United States II- Using the Bomb 127
  • Six - Japan- The Atomic Bombs and War’s End 177
  • Seven - The Soviet Union- The Bomb and the Cold War 228
  • Eight - The World’s Bomb 270
  • Epilogue - Nightmares and Hopes 304
  • Notes 310
  • Bibliographical Essay 340
  • Credits 356
  • Index 357
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