Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery

By Howard McGary; Bill E. Lawson | Go to book overview

NOTES

Philosophy and American Slavery

1. See, e.g., William J. Anderson, Life and Narrative of William]. Anderson: or, Dark Deeds of American Slavery Revealed, Written by Himself (Chicago: Daily Tribune Book and Job Printing Office, 1854); Charles Ball, Slavery in the United States: A Narrative of the Life of Charles Ball, a Black Man, Who Lived Forty Years in Maryland, South Carolina, and Georgia as a Slave (New York: John S. Taylor, 1837); Henry Bibb, Narrative of the Life of Henry Bibb, an American Slave, Written by Himself(New York: By the author, 1850); Linda Brent, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Boston: By the author, 1861); Isaac Brown, Case of the Slave Isaac Brown: An Outrage Exposed! (n.p.: n.p., 1847); Jane Brown, Narrative of the Life of Jane Brown and Her Two Children: Related to the Reverend G. W. Offley (Hartford: Published for G. W. Offley, 1860); William Wells Brown, Narrative of William Wells Brown, a Fugitive Slave, Written by Himself (Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1847); Annie L. Burton, Memories of Childhood’s Slavery Days (Boston: Ross Publishing Company, 1919); William Craft, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom: or, the Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (London: W. Tweedie, 1860); Dinah, The Story of Dinah, as Related to John Hawkins Simpson, after Her Escape from the Horrors of the Virginia Slave Trade, to London (London: A. W. Bennett, 1863); Frederick Douglass, Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Written by Himself (Boston: Boston Anti-Slavery Office, 1845); Elleanor Eldridge, Memoirs of Elleanor Eldridge (Providence: B. T. Albro, 1847); Josiah Henson, Truth Stranger Than Fiction: Father Henson’s Story of His Own Life (Boston: John P. Jewett, 1858); Elizabeth Keckley, Behind the Scenes by Elizabeth Keckley, Formerly a Slave, but More Recently Modiste, and Friend to Mrs. Abraham Lincoln: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (New York: G. W. Carlton, 1868); Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841 and Rescued in January, 1853, from a Cotton Plantation Near Red River in Louisiana (Buffalo: Derby, Orton and Mulligan, 1853); Ralph Roberts, “A Slave’s Story,” Putnam’s Monthly 9 (June 1857), 614-20; and Sojourner Truth, Narrative of Sojourner Truth, a Northern Slave, Emancipated from Bodily Servitude by the State of New York, in 1828 (Boston: By the author, 1853).

2. See, e.g., R. M. Hare, “What Is Wrong with Slavery?” Philosophy and Public Affairs 8: 2 (1979), 103-21, and John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1971).

3. Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, American Negro Slavery: A Survey of the Supply, Employment and Control of Negro Labor as Determined by the Plantation Regime

-113-

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Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Blacks in the Diaspora ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Philosophy and American Slavery - An Introduction xvii
  • One - Oppression and Slavery 1
  • Two - Paternalism and Slavery 16
  • Three - Resistance and Slavery 35
  • Four - Citizenship and Slavery 55
  • Five - Moral Discourse and Slavery 71
  • Six - Forgiveness and Slavery 90
  • Notes 113
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 140
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