Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery

By Howard McGary; Bill E. Lawson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abolitionism: liberalism and rationalizations of slavery, 30
Abortion: influence of language on social policy, 86
Accountability: forgiveness and blame, 99
Actions: morality and forgiveness, 100-102
Affirmative action: moral discourse and slavery experience, 82-85
Agents, moral: defined, xxv; forgiveness and actions, 101
Alienation: oppression and slavery, 3-4
Analytical philosophy: as approach to study of slave narratives, xvii; powerlessness and concepts of oppression and forgiveness, xviii-xix; concept of resistance, 38. See also Philosophy
Apartheid: language of moral discourse, 85
Apprenticeship: British Empire and transition from slave system, 123n.32
Authenticity: debate on reliability of slave narratives, xx
Autobiography. See Slave narratives
Autonomy: paternalistic explanations of slavery, 29; slavery and political status of blacks after emancipation, 62
Beliefs: defining acts of resistance in terms of, 40-41; concept of unconscious resistance, 42-43; tactics of resistance and sincerity of, 44-45; alternative account of resistance, 48-54
Beneficent institution: belief in slavery as, 21, 22
Benevolent dictator/citizen model: paternalistic accounts of slavery, 28-29
Black liberation movement: beliefs of victims about oppression, 51
Blacks: debate on impact of slavery on political and social status, xxiv-xxv; oppression of freedmen in antebellum period, 9-12; present-day and oppression, 13; failure of government to protect after emancipation, 13-15, 59-60, 64, 75, 122n.10; beliefs in inferiority of as justification for slavery, 23-24; citizenship and slavery, 55-70; social and political history of and lexical gaps in moral/ political vocabulary, 78, 89; language and governmental policy, 78-82; language and affirmative action, 82-85; language and understanding of slavery experience, 87-89; self-respect as crucial theme in writings of contemporary, 110-11
Blame: and forgiveness, 99-100
Bradley, Justice Joseph P.: slavery and moral discourse after emancipation, 71-72, 73, 86
Brent, Linda: cruel treatment of female slaves, 5; concept of partus sequitur ventrem, 7; attitudes of southern women regarding slaves, 9; slave women and acts of resistance, 35
British Empire: apprenticeship and transition from slavery, 123n.32
Brutality: scholarly debate on slavery, xxv. See also Cruelty
Cartwright, Dr. Samuel: apologists for slavery and paternalism, 20-21
Census: language and social status of free blacks in antebellum South, 77-78
Chattels: blacks as property and distinctive character of American slavery, 8-9
Children: government and institution of slavery, 6-7; parent/child model and paternalistic accounts of slavery, 25-26; sale of away from slave mothers, 32-33; intentions and acts of resistance, 47; government and paternalistic position toward blacks and citizenship, 61
Christianity: paternalistic accounts of slavery, 27-28; slave religion and contradiction between slavery and, 91-92; for

-140-

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Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Blacks in the Diaspora ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Philosophy and American Slavery - An Introduction xvii
  • One - Oppression and Slavery 1
  • Two - Paternalism and Slavery 16
  • Three - Resistance and Slavery 35
  • Four - Citizenship and Slavery 55
  • Five - Moral Discourse and Slavery 71
  • Six - Forgiveness and Slavery 90
  • Notes 113
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 140
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