Creatures of Politics: Media, Message, and the American Presidency

By Michael Lempert; Michael Silverstein | Go to book overview

PREFACE & ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In this book we bring together, adapt, and blend material we have been separately developing over the last decade. Mutually discovering that each of us has been following American electoral politics—particularly, American presidential politics—with a similarly attuned linguistic anthropological eye and ear has animated this collaborative effort.

Contemporary linguistic anthropology moves analytically in several concurrently applied ways. Trying to understand how a particular focal communicative event has had certain effects (even effectiveness in some social realm) inevitably leads the analyst to investigate the cultural values illustrated or frustrated by the key signals—verbal, gestural, behavioral, sartorial, and so on—that participants generate, as revealed in the transcribed record of the event. Generally this involves looking at any particular communicative event in a documented or putative trajectory of other events with which it can be associated for one or another reason—for example, an event and other events that report that the first event took place. (This last relationship is central to political news and commentary, of course.) We are concerned with matters of a politician’s personal style against a backdrop of what appear to be normative expectations of how particular kinds of events “should” take place, and with the strategies and frames that license or animate the display of the stylistically distinctive.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creatures of Politics: Media, Message, and the American Presidency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface & Acknowledgments xi
  • One - Introduction- "Message" Is the Medium 1
  • Two - Getting It "Ju … St Right!" 58
  • Three - Addressing "The Issues" 105
  • Four - Ethno-Blooperology 122
  • Five - Unflipping the Flop 144
  • Six - The Message in Hand 170
  • Seven - What Goes around … 200
  • Notes 231
  • References 245
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.