Elie Wiesel: Jewish, Literary, and Moral Perspectives

By Steven T. Katz; Alan Rosen | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Victoria Aarons holds the Mitchell Distinguished Professorship of Literature and chairs the Department of English at Trinity University, where she teaches courses on American Jewish and Holocaust literatures. She is the author of A Measure of Memory: Storytelling and Identity in American Jewish Fiction and What Happened to Abraham? Reinventing the Covenant in American Jewish Fiction, both recipients of the Choice Award for Outstanding Academic Book.

Alan L. Berger holds the Raddock Family Eminent Scholar Chair of Holocaust Studies and directs the Center for the Study of Values and Violence after Auschwitz at Florida Atlantic University. Among his books are Second Generation Voices: Reflections by Children of Holocaust Survivors and Perpetrators (coedited with his wife, Naomi), winner of the Bnai Zion National Media Award; Jewish-Christian Dialogue: Drawing Honey from the Rock, coauthored with David Patterson; and Trialogue and Terror: The Abrahamic Religions after 9/11, editor.

Reinhold Boschki is professor for religious education at the Roman-Catholic Faculty of Bonn University, Germany. In the 1980s he was studying under Elie Wiesel at Boston University and wrote his PhD dissertation on Wiesel’s work. He has published books and articles on Holocaust education, Christian-Jewish relations, theology after Auschwitz, and interreligious and moral education.

Ariel Burger is the director of the Commission on Jewish Life and Learning at Combined Jewish Philanthropies. He completed his PhD in Jewish philosophy and conflict studies at Boston University, where he served as Elie Wiesel’s teaching fellow. His dissertation, “Hasidic Nonviolence: R. Noson of Bratzlav’s Hermeneutic of Conflict Transformation,” received the University Professors Program Alumni Award for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation for 2007–2008. He has taught widely and facilitated workshops for religious, business, and education leaders. He is an ordained rabbi, and an accomplished artist and musician.

Irwin Cotler is a Canadian member of Parliament, having formerly served as a minister of justice and attorney general. He is currently on leave as a professor of law at McGill University, where he is director of its Human Rights Programme, and chair of InterAmicus, the McGill-based International Human Rights Advocacy Centre. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, a Woodrow Wilson Fellow at

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