Global Governance and the UN: An Unfinished Journey

By Thomas G. Weiss; Ramesh Thakur | Go to book overview

9
Protecting against Pandemics
Antecedents: Smallpox as a Model
Knowledge Gaps: From Ignorance to Ignorance
Normative Gaps: A Missing Prelude to Action
Policy Gaps: The Need to Scale Up the Attack
Institutional Gaps: Necessary but Insufficient Organizations
Compliance Gaps: Who Is Listening?
Close Calls: SARS and Avian Flu
Conclusion: Fitful and Halting Progress

The rapidity with which some diseases can spread to become global pandemics; the emergence of new, deadly, and highly contagious diseases; the absence of border defenses to protect against such diseases; and the greater vulnerability of poor countries and poor people because of virtually nonexistent preventive and negligible therapeutic care are among the down sides of globalization. A deadly cocktail of exotic diseases crosses borders free of passport and visa regulations due to the back-and-forth movement of business travelers, tourists, traders, soldiers, migrants, and refugees; the modes of transport they use; incubation periods that ensure that many who contract diseases develop symptoms only after borders have been crossed; and the ability of some diseases to jump across plant, bird, and animal species.

Over the last decade, the world has witnessed four potential scares: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, 2002-2003), the Ebola virus (2000-2008), avian influenza (bird flu, 2005-2006), and the H1N1 flu (swine flu, 2008-2010). In combination with HIV/AIDS, they pushed to the very top of the international agenda the issue of the global governance of health. The task is huge, ranging from gathering statistics to creating codes of conduct about breast feeding, from finding ways around patent rights

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Global Governance and the UN: An Unfinished Journey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Boxes, Tables, and Graphs vii
  • Series Editors’ Foreword ix
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • Introduction - The Problématiqueoi Global Governance 1
  • 1 - Tracing the Origins of an Idea and the Un’s Contribution 28
  • Part1 - International Security 53
  • 2 - The Use of Force- War, Collective Security and Peace Operations 55
  • 3 - Arms Control and Disarmament 90
  • 4 - Terrorism 128
  • Part 2 - Development 153
  • 5 - Trade, Aid, and Finance 155
  • 6 - Sustainable Development 199
  • 7 - Saving the Environment- The Ozone Layer and Climate Change 227
  • Part 3 - Human Rights 257
  • 8 - Generations of Rights 259
  • 9 - Protecting against Pandemics 286
  • 10 - The Responsibility to Protect 308
  • Notes 341
  • Index 391
  • About the Authors 417
  • About the United Nations Intellectual History Project 419
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