Keeping Faith with the Party: Communist Believers Return from the Gulag

By Nanci Adler | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This work would not have been possible without the deeply personal contributions of a number of extraordinary individuals, who took the time to talk, listen, and think about a difficult, sensitive, and even painful subject. For this, I gratefully acknowledge: Gerta Chuprun, Elena Karagaeva, Marlen Korallov, Mariia Kuznetsova, Tania Langerova, Roy Medvedev, Nataliia Rykova, Zoria Serebriakova, and Evgeniia Smirnova. With equal gratitude, I acknowledge the memoirists whom I did not have the privilege to meet, but whose experiences are recorded and analyzed in this book. These Gulag victims and survivors were instrumental in shaping my perceptions. Arsenii Roginskii, a longtime friend, has been invaluable to this research. He advised me, debated with me, sharpened my conceptualization of this complex topic, and, most challengingly perhaps, invited and encouraged me to reflect upon my conclusions with critical Russian audiences. Semen Vilenskii has guided my understanding of the Gulag by generously sharing his own experiences, his wealth of knowledge, and his contacts since the day we met in 1995; I am richer for knowing him. Vladlen Loginov took on my task as if it were his own, providing advice, introductions, criticism, and perspective. My thanks also go to Nikita Petrov, ever ready to help when I needed it.

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge a number of institutions for supporting this project. In the first place, this research was most generously funded by an Innovative Grant from the Netherlands Scientific Council (NWO). Support was also provided by the University of Amsterdam, the department of East European Studies, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies of the Netherlands Institute for War Documentation. The archives RGASPI, RGANI,

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