Brothers to the Buffalo Soldiers: Perspectives on the African American Militia and Volunteers, 1865-1917

By Bruce A. Glasrud | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

Ann Field Alexander is Professor of History at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia. She received her Ph.D. from Duke University and is the author of Race Man: The Rise and Fall of the Fighting Editor, a biography of John Mitchell, Jr., the editor of the Richmond Planet. Published in 2002 by the University of Virginia Press, this book won the Virginia Historical Society’s Richard Slatten Award for Excellence in Virginia Biography.

Alwyn Barr is professor emeritus of history at Texas Tech University and a former chair of the history department. Among his five authored books are: Black Texans: A History of African Americans in Texas, 1528–1995 and African Texans. He also has edited, with Robert A. Calvert, Black Leaders: Texans for Their Times, and has written the Introduction to Black Cowboys of Texas, edited by Sara R. Massey, as well as several articles on African American history in professional journals. He is a former president of the Texas State Historical Association and a board member of Humanities Texas.

Russell K. Brown is a retired army officer, retired from nuclear power plant management and a former college instructor. He is the author of four books and dozens of articles on U.S. military history and biography. He is a native of Brooklyn, New York and a resident of Grovetown, Georgia.

Roger D. Cunningham retired from the Army as a lieutenant colonel and now spends his time as an independent military historian, specializing in black participation in militia and volunteer units. He is the author of The Black Citizen-Soldiers of Kansas, 1864–1901.

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