The Children of Aataentsic: A History of the Huron People to 1660

By Bruce G. Trigger | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER SEVEN

1. Trudel (1966a: 526) suggests Manet, Nicollet, or Richer; however, only Richer worked exclusively among the Algonkin in the late 1620s (ibid. 496–500).

2. However, see n. 4, chapter 6.

3. For another version of this incident, see Biggar 1922–36, 5:229–31.

4. See, for example Le Jeune to Richelieu, Thwaites 1896–1901, 7:241–45 and 9:171.

5. Cranston 1949:137–44. For other ideas, see Jurgens 1966:133.

6. For an instance of a household moving from one village to another, see Thwaites 1896–1901, 10:285.

7. Grant 1952:8, based on Laverdière. Campeau (1951–52) vigorously denies this claim.

8. For the latest account of this trip, see Hamelin 1966b: 517. Lurie (1960:800–801) provides an effective critique of the more extravagant interpretations of his mission.

9. The Jesuit Relation of 1642–43 states specifically that this peace was between the Huron and the Winnebago (Thwaites 1896–1901, 25:277); however, in 1636 Le Jeune mentions the Winnebago breaking their truce with the Algonkianspeaking Amikou people (10:83). This suggests that the truce was, in fact, between the Winnebago and the Ottawa or other Algonkian-speaking groups. For a discussion of this point, see Lurie 1960:794.

10. The two other Frenchmen who embarked are said to have gone with the Algonkians. They were probably Nicollet and a companion.

11. Talbot (1956:128) implies that the Jesuits’ old cabin was still standing in Toanché. The cabin Brébeuf refers to was clearly a Huron dwelling.


CHAPTER EIGHT

1. If Ihonatiria had 300 inhabitants, about eight deaths per year would have been normal and most of these would have occurred during the winter. Yet in the winter of 1634–35, five people died in one longhouse (of 30 inhabitants?).

It is impossible to know if the number for this house was higher than the average for the village as a whole or the average for the village was higher than that for the Huron as a whole.

2. For an exception, see Thwaites 1896–1901, 8:139.

3. In later times, the French collier meant a wampum belt and it probably did at this time as well; however, because we have no description of Huron colliers for this early period, I have chosen to use the more neutral “collar” to translate this term. For a discussion of the use of these belts in Indian diplomacy, see Vachon 1970 and 1971.

4. Nicolas Rehault, Marquis de Gamache provided the funds for this school (Thwaites 1896–1901, 8:227). This gift, amounting to 16,000 écus of

-851-

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The Children of Aataentsic: A History of the Huron People to 1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Illustrations xvi
  • Maps xxi
  • Preface to the 1987 Reprinting xxiv
  • Preface to the First Edition xxxviii
  • To Barbara, Isabel, and Rosalyn xliv
  • Chapter 1- Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2- The Huron and Their Neighbours 27
  • Chapter 3- The Birth of the Huron 105
  • Chapter 4- Alien Shadows 177
  • Chapter 5- Forging an Alliance 246
  • Chapter 6- The Quiet Years 331
  • Chapter 7- The Interregnum and - The New Alliance 455
  • Chapter 8- The Deadly Harvest 499
  • Chapter 9- The Storm 603
  • Chapter 10- The Storm within 665
  • Chapter 11- The End of the Confederacy 725
  • Chapter 12- Betrayal and Salvation 789
  • Chapter 13- Conclusions 841
  • Notes 851
  • References 857
  • Index 885
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