The European Union Explained: Institutions, Actors, Global Impact

By Andreas Staab | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book first took shape as a series of handouts designed for participants in seminars organized by EPIC—the European Policy Information Centre—which itself originated within the European Institute at the London School of Economics, where I taught until the summer of 2000. During that year a number of colleagues encouraged me to establish EPIC as an independent training agency and consultancy. Over the years we have been fortunate to work with civil servants, ministers, Supreme Court judges, businesspeople, and representatives from the nonprofit sector, as well as high school and university students from a number of EU accession and candidate countries. Thus the book has been shaped by the experiences of those for whom the EU is of practical relevance in their professional lives, as well as of individuals for whom Europe represents a panacea that may ultimately deliver political stability and economic prosperity.

Created for people for whom English is not their mother tongue, our courses, of necessity, were conducted in a style stripped of excessive academic jargon. It was Martin Lodge, a former colleague from the London School of Economics and a current EPIC associate, who suggested that the course handouts that accompany our seminars would be suitable for an undergraduate and indeed a nonacademic audience, and thus this book was born.

Several colleagues and friends of the EPIC family have offered much appreciated guidance and support, enabling me to narrow my own knowledge gaps and enhance my understanding of EU affairs. I am indebted to Martin Lodge, who added factual and analytical depth to the text. Charles Dannreuther was behind the conceptualization of the first chapter as well as the chapter on the environment.

-xiii-

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The European Union Explained: Institutions, Actors, Global Impact
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Acronyms xv
  • Tables xix
  • Part One - The Evolution of the European Union 1
  • 1 - Parameters of European Integration 3
  • 2 - Enlarsement 32
  • Part Two - Institutions 47
  • 3 - The European Commission 49
  • 4 - The European Council 56
  • 5 - The Council of Ministers 61
  • 6 - The European Parliament 67
  • 7 - The European Court of Justice 76
  • 8 - Checks and Balances 84
  • Part Three - Policies 91
  • 9 - The Single Market and Competition 93
  • 10 - Regional Rolicy and Cohesion 106
  • 11 - The Common Agricultural Policy 116
  • 12 - Economic and Monetary Union 128
  • 13 - Justice and Home Affairs 141
  • 14 - Common Foreign and Security Policy 151
  • 15 - Trade and the Common Commercial Policy 161
  • 16 - Environment 171
  • 17 - The Sovereign Debt Crisis in the Eurozone 179
  • Outlook- The Future of European Integration 197
  • Notes 205
  • Bibliosraphy 225
  • Index 229
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