Early and School-Age Care in Santa Monica: Current System, Policy Options, and Recommendations

By Ashley Pierson; Lynn A. Karoly et al. | Go to book overview

3. ESAC Funding Streams and Policy Environment

ESAC may be paid for by private sources—for example, by families themselves or perhaps by employers—or it may be partially or fully subsidized by federal, state, or local funding streams, either by payments to providers or families or through tax subsidies to families. In this section, we catalogue the various sources of public support for ECE and OST care—noting who is eligible to receive such government subsidies, which funding sources are currently used to pay for care in Santa Monica, and the funding outlook for each source. Our aim is to identify the funding sources that are likely to be most viable and sustainable in Santa Monica in the next five to ten years. This section seeks to inform the first research question regarding federal and state budget and policy changes, as well as the second research question relating to existing funding streams.


Funding Sources for Direct Care Provision or Vouchers

The top section of Table 3.1 provides an overview of the public funding streams that supported ESAC in Santa Monica as of fiscal year (FY) 2011–2012. The bottom section includes several potential sources of federal or state funding for which no funds were available in Santa Monica in that year. Thus, the table captures both actual and potential funding streams. It also denotes whether funding comes from federal, state, or local sources and lists the child ages for which a given funding stream applies. The population eligible for each source is also indicated, along with the funding in Santa Monica for 2011–2012. Additional detail on the two funding line items from the City of Santa Monica general fund for ECE and OST programs are shown in Table 3.2, with the adopted budget figures shown for FY 2011–2012 and the proposed budget for 2013– 2014.5

As shown in Table 3.1, there is a complex web of federal, state, and local funding streams that support or are potentially available to subsidize care for children from birth to age 12 through payments to providers (grants or contracts) or payments to families in the form of vouchers.6 Most funding streams target disadvantaged children, although the eligibility requirements vary. Several programs aspire to provide universal coverage, but funding limits

5 Table 3.1 excludes the employee child care subsidies line item included in the City’s Youth Budget for ECE, about $30,000 in the two budget years shown. In contrast to the other programs listed in Table 3.1, these funds can be viewed as a fringe benefit for City employees, rather than as funding for subsidized care more generally available in the community.

6 Smaller funding streams not mentioned here include the Cal-Learn and California School Age Families Education (Cal-SAFE) programs. See Karoly, Reardon, and Cho (2007) for details for all but the Santa Monica funding streams.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early and School-Age Care in Santa Monica: Current System, Policy Options, and Recommendations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 156

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.