Libya after Qaddafi: Lessons and Implications for the Future

By Christopher S. Chivvis; Jeffrey Martini | Go to book overview

Summary

Since the 2011 overthrow of the Qaddafi regime, Libya’s path has been tumultuous. Despite a number of advantages compared with other post-conflict societies, progress on political, economic, and security fronts has fallen far behind, generating frustration and threatening the recovery altogether. Libya has teetered on the brink of a relapse into civil war on more than one occasion in the past year. In the absence of a functioning state, jihadist groups have made inroads. The broader Sahel and Maghreb regions, meanwhile, are becoming more and more fragile and southern Libya verges on becoming a safe haven for al Qaeda–linked groups recently chased from Mali by French military forces.

The right international approach to Libya could nevertheless still help avert a more serious breakdown and real damage to U.S. and European regional and global interests—above all counterterrorism and the stability of world energy markets.

This study examines what has been accomplished in Libya to date, draws lessons from the experience, and identifies some possible ways forward.


Lack of Security

Libya’s most serious problem since 2011 has been the lack of security. Insecurity has had negative repercussions across the spectrum. It has undermined efforts to build functioning political and administrative institutions, further constricted an already minimal international

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Libya after Qaddafi: Lessons and Implications for the Future
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Summary ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Security after the War 7
  • Chapter Three - Statebuilding Challenges 35
  • Chapter Four - Economic Stabilization and the Oil Economy 53
  • Chapter Five - Alternative Strategies 65
  • Chapter Six - Libya’s Future Path—steps for the International Community 79
  • Bibliography 87
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