Lone Star Muslims: Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas

By Ahmed Afzal | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

During the last one decade, as I have worked on this research project, I have accumulated much intellectual debt thanks to the immense generosity of interlocutors along the way. This book bears my name as the author, but it is a collaborative effort with a number of people — both within and outside of the academy. I am sure to leave out some names, and I can in no way do justice to the generosity of those whose contributions continue to inspire, shape, and guide my scholarly endeavors. I am deeply indebted to my mentor, Kamari Clarke at Yale University, for her unflagging support, thoughtful guidance, and excellent scholarly advice. I remain extremely grateful to the intellectual and institutional support provided by George Marcus during my fifteen-month-long field research in Houston in 2001 and 2002. I am very appreciative of the opportunity to work with Thomas Blom Hansen during the initial stages of writing at Yale University.

At Yale University, from 1998 to 2006, I benefited greatly from the intellectual support and constructive feedback from the following colleagues: Arjun Appadurai, Bernard Bate, Faisal Devji, Joseph Errington, David Graeber, Kira Hall, William W. Kelly, Mary Liu, Patricia Pessar, Mridu Rai, Linda Anne Rehbun, Hal Scheffler, Helen Siu, David Watts, and Eric Worby. I am enormously thankful to members of a writing group at Yale University from 2003 to 2005: Karen Warner, Robert Clark, Tanya Hart, and Vladimir Gil for their excellent feedback, and most important, collegiality.

I would also like to thank Shemeem Abbas, Ping-Ann Addo, Safiya Aftab, Nina Bhatt, Nicholas de Genova, Richard Gioioso, Jason Harle, Chris Henke, Carolyn Hsu, Matthew Immergut, Naveeda Khan, Saba Khattak, Amitava Kumar, Nita Kumar, Prema Kurien, Meika Loe, Lisa Jean Moore, Mary Moran, Gaura Narayan, Hamid Naficy, Veronica

-ix-

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