Lone Star Muslims: Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas

By Ahmed Afzal | Go to book overview

3
“It’s Allah’s Will”
The Transnational Muslim Heritage Economy

For several months during the course of my ethnographic research, I carried out fieldwork at a South Asian video and DVD sale and rental store located in a strip mall on Hillcroft Avenue. This particular strip mall, a couple of blocks south of the Mahatma Gandhi District, overlooking Highway 59, was within walking distance to several predominantly Pakistani and Indian residential buildings and gated communities as well as a mosque. The strip mall included Middle Eastern and Indian grocery stores, an Indian ethnic jewelry shop, a photocopy and printing center, a South Indian vegetarian restaurant, a travel agency specializing in travel to South Asia, a Middle Eastern bakery, and a Mexican-owned and-managed deli. Most businesses were family-run enterprises. The video and DVD store, for instance, was owned and managed by a young Pakistani couple, Ali and Nadia, who had resided in Houston since 1999.

The business catered to a South Asian population. The store specialized in South Asian ethnic entertainment and offered an extensive collection of DVDs and video cassettes of Hindi language films and television programs produced in India and Urdu-language television programs produced in Pakistan. In addition to the several hundred alphabetically arranged videotapes and DVDs, the store also carried an enviable array of audiotapes and CDs of Indian and Pakistani film soundtracks, folk, and classical music that were visible through glass countertops that spanned the length of the brightly lit, rectangularshaped store. In one corner of the shop, colorful and vibrant displays of imported Pakistani ethnic jewelry adorned the glass counter and wooden shelves. During the long day, Ali and Nadia would take turns

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lone Star Muslims: Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.