Lone Star Muslims: Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas

By Ahmed Afzal | Go to book overview

Conclusion

On a late summer Sunday afternoon in 2005, over a leisurely lunch of delicious chicken shawarma and hummus sandwiches at a halal Lebanese restaurant and supermarket on Hillcroft Avenue, I met with Tariq. Tariq is a middle-aged Pakistani American engineer who is actively involved in one of the major Sunni Muslim community centers in Houston. I had first met Tariq during the course of my initial fieldwork in 2001 – 2002, and we were meeting on this day to catch up. The conversation turned to the challenges that continued to face Muslim Americans. About one thing, Tariq was clear: the need for the secondgeneration Muslims to forge alliances with non-Muslim Americans and to participate in the larger political society. As Tariq said to me:

On the one hand we have to keep our fundamentals intact. On the other,
we have to keep open, all [of] the avenues of interactions with Ameri-
cans from all religions. We cannot remain isolated. We need to hold on
to our fundamentals, our culture and our traditions but we also need to
interact [with non-Muslims] at the same time.

We were interrupted as Tariq got up to greet some of his friends who were shopping at the super market. As Tariq sat down, he continued:

This is a very difficult time for Muslims…. The second generation, the
children of the immigrants, need to stay committed to their religious
beliefs and culture … at the same time, they are the best people to com-
municate with the [U.S.] society. They are more familiar with the politics
of this society.

As if to emphasize the point, Tariq repeated:

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lone Star Muslims: Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.