Food Is Love: Food Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America

By Katherine J. Parkin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to have the opportunity to thank publicly the many people and institutions who have helped me write this book. It has been a rewarding process, enriched by sharing it with others.

From the beginning, I benefited from the sage advice of Margaret Marsh, who has always modeled her professionalism and kindness, and been a tremendous advisor to me. I am grateful to Kathy Peiss, Allen F. Davis, and Herbert Ershkowitz for their thoughtful comments on my work. I would like to thank Temple University and its History Department for its support of my work with assistantships and grants.

I was also fortunate to gain financial support at the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, where Ellen Gartrell and Jacqueline Reid both served as knowledgeable guides to their collections. And Hedy Dichter kindly opened up her home in Peekskill, New York, which holds the archive of her late husband, Ernest Dichter.

Entrusting this book to Robert Lockhart at the University of Pennsylvania Press has been one of the best decisions I have ever made. Thoughtful, respectful, and supportive, he, along with Eleanor Goldberg and Alison Anderson, have made the production experience a pleasurable one. The responses of Jennifer Scanlon and my other anonymous reader improved this book immeasurably, and I deeply appreciate their suggestions and support for the book.

At Monmouth University I have found wonderful colleagues, and I am grateful to the members of the History and Anthropology Department, especially Brian Greenberg, Rich Veit, Fred McKitrick, Karen Schmelzkopf, Julius Adekunle, Ken Campbell, Matthew O’Brien, Maureen Dorment, Susan Douglass, Frank Dooley, Kathy Smith-Wenning, Bill Mitchell, Mustafa Aksakal, Stan Greenberg, Tom Pearson, and Chris DeRosa. My undergraduate and graduate students, too, have been wonderful supporters. In particular, I would like to thank Lindsay Currie,

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