Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s

By Simon Hall | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
New Coalitions, Old Problems

Unity cannot be based on air or rhetoric. It must be concrete and reflect the
real ties that exist between different sections of the population.

NCAWRR Non-White Caucus Position Paper, circa 1971

The winter and early spring of 1970 was a particularly low period for the antiwar movement. The April antiwar demonstrations, sponsored by the New Mobe and the Vietnam Moratorium Committee, although widespread, were relatively small. Richard Nixon’s policy of Vietnamization, leaving the South Vietnamese to do most of the ground fighting while the U.S. increased its bombing campaign, commanded wide public support, and helped to drain the movement’s strength. The antiwar coalition was weakened further by internal strains, which threatened to break out into open warfare. The VMC, which had been so spectacularly successful during 1969, ran out of steam and closed its national office on April 19. Divisions between radicals and moderates, meanwhile, seriously compromised the New Mobe’s effectiveness.1

Ironically, it was Richard Nixon who managed to energize the peace movement, enabling it to overcome its ideological factionalism, albeit temporarily. The president’s April 30 announcement that he was sending American ground forces into Cambodia to destroy North Vietnamese supply lines resulted in some of the most impressive antiwar demonstrations in the nation’s history. A national student strike took hold almost instantly—after four days over 100 schools were affected. The killing of four students at Kent State on May 4 further outraged the peace movement and the campuses erupted—536 were shut down completely with 51 remaining closed for the remainder of the academic year. Protests were held at 1,350 colleges during May, with almost half the nation’s students participating. Domestic antiwar dissent had never been stronger.2 Even the NAACP’s Roy Wilkins was moved to describe the protests against the Cambodian invasion as “legitimate and timely” and declared that the “outpouring of national feeling over Kent State” was good.3

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Organizing Tradition 13
  • Chapter 2 - Black Power 39
  • Chapter 3 - Black Moderates 80
  • Chapter 4 - Racial Tensions 105
  • Chapter 5 - Radicalism and Respectability 141
  • Chapter 6 - New Coalitions, Old Problems 167
  • Conclusion 187
  • Notes 195
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 255
  • Acknowledgments 263
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.