Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s

By Simon Hall | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. The Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader: Documents, Speeches, and Firsthand Accounts from the Black Freedom Struggle, 1954–1990, general editors Clayborne Carson, David J. Garrow, Gerald Gill, Vincent Harding, and Darlene Clark Hine (New York: Penguin, 1991), 440, 452–57.

2. Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Peace Now: American Society and the Ending of the Vietnam War (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999), 104.

3. See Charles DeBenedetti with Charles Chatfield, An American Ordeal: The Antiwar Movement of the Vietnam Era (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1990), 158.

4. Martin Luther King, “A Time to Break Silence,” quoted in The Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader, 390, 392.

5. Adam Fairclough, Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equality, 1890–2000 (New York: Penguin, 2002), 133–40, 152–56.

6. Fairclough, Better Day Coming, 183–85; Robert Cook, Sweet Land of Liberty? The African-American Struggle for Civil Rights in the Twentieth Century (Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1998), 53–56.

7. See James Farmer, Lay Bare the Heart: An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement (New York: Plume, 1985), 74, 81–85, 175; Tim Tyson, Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999); Robert Weisbrot, Freedom Bound: A History of America’s Civil Rights Movement (New York: Plume, 1990), 55.

8. Fairclough, Better Day Coming, 22, 46; Farmer, Lay Bare the Heart, 193.

9. Fairclough, Better Day Coming, 236–38; Jervis Anderson, Bayard Rustin: Troubles I’ve Seen. A Biography (New York: HarperCollins, 1997), 3–17, 153–54.

10. Anderson, Bayard Rustin, 236–38.

11. Anderson, Bayard Rustin, 193–94; James A. Colaiaco, Martin Luther King, Jr. Apostle of Militant Nonviolence (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1993), 34; Weisbrot, Freedom Bound, 56.

12. Robert S. Browne, “The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam,” in Vietnam and Black America: An Anthology of Protest and Resistance, ed. Clyde Taylor (Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor/Doubleday, 1973), 69; editorial, “Close Ranks,” Crisis 16, 3 (July 1918): 1, quoted in David L. Lewis, W. E. B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868–1919 (New York: Henry Holt, 1993), 556.

-195-

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Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Organizing Tradition 13
  • Chapter 2 - Black Power 39
  • Chapter 3 - Black Moderates 80
  • Chapter 4 - Racial Tensions 105
  • Chapter 5 - Radicalism and Respectability 141
  • Chapter 6 - New Coalitions, Old Problems 167
  • Conclusion 187
  • Notes 195
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 255
  • Acknowledgments 263
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