Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s

By Simon Hall | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

During the writing of this book I have received aid and comfort from an assortment of individuals and institutions. These lengthy acknowledgments should be taken as evidence not merely of my own self-indulgence, but also of my considerable good fortune.

This project would not have been possible without the financial support of the Arts and Humanities Research Board, for which I am thankful. Further vital contributions came from the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library (a Moody Research Grant), the Sara Norton Fund (Cambridge University), and Sidney Sussex College. The incredible generosity of Joseph Carrere and Alison Barbour Fox enabled me to spend the spring semester of 2002 carrying out additional research and writing as a Fox International Fellow at Yale University.

The roots of this project are to be found in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. As an undergraduate newly liberated from the horrors of computer science, I began to acquire an interest in American history while listening to the captivating lectures of Richard Carwardine and Patrick Renshaw (the computer science lecturers never sang!). I became fascinated by the civil rights movement as a student on Robert Cook’s excellent special subject, and was ensnared permanently when taking the MA in American History. While Richard and Robert helped me to appreciate the finer points of the historian’s craft, Eithne Middleton and Peter Webster provided me with the rent-free housing that made everything else possible. Of the other MA students at Sheffield, Joe Street and Andy Lee deserve special mention for their camaraderie. Others who helped to make the year fun include Emma Barker, Sean Kelly, Graham Macklin, the irrepressible Kevin Watson (more of him later), and Chris Williams.

Like all who have studied American History at Cambridge University in the recent past I owe a great deal to Tony Badger, who has helped build a vibrant and thriving community of Americanists there. Tony encouraged me to write when I did not want to, and offered guidance

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Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Organizing Tradition 13
  • Chapter 2 - Black Power 39
  • Chapter 3 - Black Moderates 80
  • Chapter 4 - Racial Tensions 105
  • Chapter 5 - Radicalism and Respectability 141
  • Chapter 6 - New Coalitions, Old Problems 167
  • Conclusion 187
  • Notes 195
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 255
  • Acknowledgments 263
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