Notes

Preface

1. Estes 1979:6–12, 228–29.

2. Piven and Cloward 1979:6. The anthropologist Maurice Bloch (1977) posited that human societies contain both (1) an ideological “cognitive model,” encapsulated in ritual, ceremony, and leaderly pronouncement, which enshrines “a system of classification of human beings” that “institutionalize[s] hierarchy,” and (2) a pragmatic model concerned with production and “flesh and bone” practical concerns. From the first perspective it would be culturally appropriate for the retired and economically unproductive elderly to disengage.

3. Piven and Cloward 1979:7. Viewing contemporary capitalism “as a cultural system,” the anthropologist Marshall Sahlins (1976:205–21) proposed that hierarchical “symbolic valuations” may be transformed by either “changes in the structure of production”—the Marxist perspective—or by “superstructural” forces, such as “a new radical movement.” See Sahlins 2000:277–351 for his perspective on individual agency.

4. Brecher 1972:144–216; Evans and Boyte 1992:69–94; Fleischer and Zames 2001:49–56; Lofland 1985:265–69, 299–314; Morris 1984:188–215; Shields 1981:49–56.

5. See Sanjek 1977, 1987.

6. Clark 1973; Clark and Anderson 1967. For overviews of the anthropology of aging, see Keith 1982; Cohen 1994; and Shield and Aronson 2003, all of which invoke Maggie Kuhn and the Gray Panthers.

7. Sanjek 1998.

8. Kuhn, Long, and Quinn 1991.

9. This talk, to the City University of New York Anthropology Colloquium in May 1978, was later given before other audiences and published as Sanjek 1987.

10. As the anthropologist Simon Ottenberg explains, written notes are complemented by “the memories of my field research. I call them my headnotes. … The published record [thus] is a construction of reality out of my two sets of notes” (1990:144–45).

11. Scratch notes, Ottenberg writes, are “taken in longhand with a pen[:] brief sentences, phrases, words, sometimes quotes—a shorthand that I enlarged upon in typing them up, adding what I remembered” (1990:148).

12. Jacobs 1980; Kuhn 1994.

13. The ethnohistorian William Fenton (1962) uses “upstreaming” to refer to interpretations of earlier written records by persons with direct ethnographic knowledge of a particular community or people; see Sanjek 1998:9–10. A splendid example is Fenton 1987.

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gray Panthers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.