Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

By Eugenie L. Birch; Susan M. Wachter | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Blue-Green Practices: Why They Work and
Why They Have Been So Difficult to
Implement Through Public Policy

CHARLIE MILLER

Blue-green features reduce the demand for potable water, limit a building’s impact on overburdened sewers, improve runoff water quality, protect natural downstream habitats, and conserve energy. They also make use of a free resource—rainfall—to create vital new urban landscapes. While common in Germany, these features are just beginning to be incorporated into buildings in the United States.

Joachim Tourbier coined the term “blue-green” technologies more than 35 years ago.1 He used it to describe a class of sustainable approaches related to the marriage of landscape design and rainfall runoff management. Blue-green features have the advantage of contributing to the aesthetic content of the built environment while drastically reducing the environmental footprint of development.

Although these might also be described as low-impact development measures, the term blue-green captures the essential interplay of plants and rainfall in achieving the benefit. Some designers, notably, Herbert Dreiseitl, Kevin Robert Perry, Faye Harwell, and Steven Koch, have made the movement of water through their urban landscapes a dominant visual and functional element in courtyards, parking facilities, building terraces, and other public and private spaces. By making the flow of runoff visually exciting, these projects help build broader understanding and support for blue-green design.

The traditional approach in urban design has been to conceal runoff when possible and to rapidly convey it away from new construction. This approach was intended to minimize nuisance flooding. It assumed that runoff could be conveyed harmlessly downstream without consequences. More important, it assumed that sources of potable public water were inexhaustible and inexpensive and it did not recognize har-

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.