Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

By Eugenie L. Birch; Susan M. Wachter | Go to book overview

Chapter 16
Metro Nature: Its Functions, Benefits, and
Values

KATHLEEN L. WOLF

A family leaves its urban row house on a sunny morning. Family members say goodbyes under the branches of a street tree. Mom walks the children through the neighborhood park to the schoolyard, recently landscaped by students to create a butterfly garden. She continues on, glancing at emerging seedlings when passing the community garden on her way to the bus stop. She boards a bus to get to work, and fellow riders peer into a green belt along the route. Dad walks down the street, shaded by overhead canopy, past small but well-tended yards. A few minutes later he arrives at his workplace, entering a building with a green roof.

Metro nature inhabits the places where people live, work, learn, and play in cities. The urban forest, community gardens, parks and open space, and public landscapes provide green backdrops for the daily routines of millions. Where not planned or planted, the inexorable energy of volunteer seeds and plants eventually interrupts the grip of pavement. If encouraged, metro nature seeps into the lives of urbanites through beauty and curiosity. But metro nature is not necessarily the nature of America’s cultural identity or idealism. City green often does not fully measure up to what many consider to be “natural.” Consequently, many overlook and often take it for granted.

Metro nature poses many quandaries for a society that favors individualism and private property rights. It is a civic resource that does not respect intentions of possession or exclusion. Gated gardens exist, providing joy and beauty to a nature hoarder. But urban greening is often a civic natural resource, with attendant tensions of who is to receive benefit and who is to steward the resource to sustain its generosity.

This chapter has two purposes. First, it traces the historical roots of American attitudes toward nature. Second, it takes up a key pragmatic

-294-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.