Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

By Eugenie L. Birch; Susan M. Wachter | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction: Urban Greening and the Green City Ideal

1. See www.thegreenguide.com/doc/113/top10cities; www.earthday.net/ UER/report/cityrank-overall.html.


Chapter 2. Growing Greener Regions

1. Each mode of transportation also has different implications for energy usage and climate change. On the least intensive end of the spectrum one finds the nonmotorized modes, including walking and bicycling, while at the other extreme one finds the single-occupancy automobile.

2. Boston, Washington, D.C., and Babylon, New York, recently enacted new mandatory green building codes. Boston’s code requires all new commercial structures over 50,000 square feet to meet a minimum of 26 of 69 criteria of the U.S. Green Building Council. Improving market conditions will couple with innovative regulatory techniques to limit the energy consumption of appliances and lighting in our region’s buildings, thereby limiting the need to generate electricity.


Chapter 3. The Inter-Regional Dimension: The Greening of London and the Wider South
East

1. See London Strategic Parks Project Report (EDAW/Greater London Authority 2006) for a good discussion.

2. Mayor Livingstone argues that the world’s major cities have a particular responsibility to lead the efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. He is spearheading a coalition of 20 of the world’s largest cities (including Philadelphia and New York) committed to joint action. The coalition has recently teamed up with the Clinton Foundation in order to use the purchasing power of city governments as an instrument for more effective climate change practice.


Chapter 4. Greening Cities: A Public Realm Approach

1. Before then, this was a place familiar to lovers of American literature—the ash heap featured in The Great Gatsby.

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