Healing Traditions: Alternative Medicine and the Health Professions

By Bonnie Blair O’Connor | Go to book overview

Glossary

Acculturation. The process of adaptation to a culture other than one’s culture of origin or first learned culture; borrowing or assimilation of traits from one cultural repertoire to another.

Adherent, (n.) Proponent, participant, or follower; (adj.) showing commitment to a proposition or course of action; current synonym or substitute term for “compliant,” used in reference to patients’ actions with respect to medical advice or prescription; thought by many to be more respectful of patients than “compliant,” because of its differences in connotation regarding authority relations and personal integrity.

Agency. The capacity, condition, or state of acting or exerting power; means by which an end is achieved or a purpose accomplished.

Agent. A person responsible for his acts; a person capable of deliberate action; one who acts or exerts power. In medical usage, any substance capable of producing an effect; an immediate cause (e.g., an infectious agent).

Ascites. Accumulation of serous fluid in the abdominal cavity.

Authority. Grounds, warrant, or convincing force; power to influence or compel opinion or behavior; “a status, quality, or claim that compels trust or obedience” (Starr 1987:9). Social authority allows for shaping or control of action through the issuing of commands or orders (civil and military authorities; parents; teachers; health professionals) and may be explicitly or implicitly underwritten by the capacity to use force. Cultural authority entails consensual recognition of the capacity to make trustworthy judgments about the nature of reality “through definitions of fact and value” (Starr 1987:13). Acceptance of others’ authority substitutes for derivation of principles or conclusions by exercise of private judgment (Starr 1987).

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Healing Traditions: Alternative Medicine and the Health Professions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.