Human Rights in Iran: The Abuse of Cultural Relativism

By Reza Afshari | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
The Right to Freedom of Thought,
Conscience, and Religion
Iranian Religious Minorities

For most of the 1980s, the Special Representative’s attention remained focused on the plight of Baha’is, who suffered more than any other community during the period under consideration. There was no discussion of other religious minorities, as the official discrimination against them was overshadowed, in international human rights reports, by the regime’s brutality toward Baha’is. Only in the early 1990s did the international human rights community begin to pay attention to the situation of other religious minorities.


Iranians of the Baha’i Faith

The change of regime in 1979 introduced new patterns of violations, creating new victims and adding new rationalizations in a constant attempt to deny and counter the charges of human rights violations. In both regimes, violations occurred mainly because of the rulers’ understanding of state security. Some recognizable groups of victims changed in the new regime, but Baha’is have remained a permanent fixture in the country’s fertile landscape of human rights abuses. They may constitute the largest non-Muslim minority. Since they do not exist officially, it is hard to determine how many thousands of them live across Iran; estimates vary from 150,000 to 500,000. The Baha’i faith has never achieved official recognition in Iran, its troubled birthplace. Islam asserts that the Prophet Muhammad was the “the seal of prophesy,” after whom there would be no divine revelation. The Baha’i Faith, which originated in the 1840s, challenges that assertion. In its birthplace city of Shiraz, the Islamic zealots destroyed the Baha’i shrine, the House of the Bab, that was associated with the founder of the faith, and the city’s three Ayatollahs witnessed and sometimes urged the persecutions and murders of the city’s Baha’is.1 Since they were assumed to have been

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Rights in Iran: The Abuse of Cultural Relativism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 411

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.