Inventing the New Negro: Narrative, Culture, and Ethnography

By Daphne Lamothe | Go to book overview

Index
Adell, Sandra, 60, 63–64
Afro-Caribbean culture: dance, 132–36; Hurston’s studies of, 141–42, 149–52; and Johnson’s youth, 74–75. See also Haiti; Haitian Vodou; Jamaica; Martinique
“allegory of salvage,” 38–39
American Anthropological Association, 193 n.45
American Association of Anthropological Societies, 34
An American Dilemma (Myrdal), 92
American Folklore Society (AFLS), 28–31, 39, 41, 189 n.17, 193 n.45; HFS scholarly delegation at 1894 meeting, 30–31; recording of African American folk songs, 30, 189 n.20
American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), 33
American Negro Academy, 44
Anderson, David, 92, 112, 205 n.24
Andrews, William, 81, 200 n.11
anthropology: “allegory of salvage,” 38–39; African American folklore and the JAFL, 39; “applied,” 20; Chicago School of Sociology, 115, 117–20, 207 nn.5–6; “classical period” of the discipline, 12, 184 n.19; and colonialism, 12, 184–85 n.20, 186 n.30; Columbia department, 32, 33, 184 n.19, 190 n.26; cultural relativism, 22, 31, 41–42, 158; cultural syncretism, 119; cultural translation, 12, 134–36, 155–58, 185 n.21, 212 nn.33–34; culture concept, 22, 32, 38, 42, 93–95, 114, 183–84 n.12, 192 n.41; culture shock, 123; dance anthropology, 115, 117–18, 122–23, 129–32; development of modern, 21–23, 31–38; early changes to the discipline, 184 n.19; ethnocentrism, 150, 153; feminist ethnography, 18, 120–21, 208 n.12; fieldwork, 9, 19, 118–20, 123–24, 150, 153; French ethnography of the 1920s and 1930s, 186–87 n.34; “going native,” 156; the Hampton Folklore Society, 23–32, 188 nn.6–7, 188 n.9; Hurston and the contradictions of the ethnographic perspective, 2–3, 5–9, 18, 142–44, 148, 150, 152–59, 187 n.40; hybrid narratives, 10–12, 17, 48, 163, 183 n.2, 184 n.15; methods, 9–20; movement between cultures, 13–14, 15; museum model, 93–95, 203 n.7, 204 n.8; the “native ethnographer,” 2–3, 14–16, 186 nn.30–32; New Negro confrontation with assumptions/objectives, 14–16, 185 n.27, 186 n.30; notion of “the field,” 54–56, 197 nn.23–24; and participant-observation, 9, 15–16, 69, 80, 125–26, 184 n.13, 199 n.2; and political neutrality ideal, 20, 186 n.30; possibilities and limitations, 12, 19–20, 183 n.2, 184–85 n.20; and postmodern “crisis of representation,” 16, 186–87 n.34; and scientific racism, 13, 21–23, 32–38, 40, 42, 141, 185 n.27, 191 n.34; and sociology discipline, 44–45, 186 n.33, 195 n.3; subject-object dichotomies, 14–16; views of race and cultural assimilation, 42–43, 194 n.52; “virtual anthropologists,” 14–15, 186 nn.31–32; women in the field, 33. See also Boas, Franz; folklore collection; New Negro ethnographic literature
Anzaldua, Gloria, 14
Aptheker, Herbert, 198 n.31
Argonauts of the Western Pacific (Malinowski), 20, 183–84 n.12, 184 n.13
Armstrong, Samuel Chapman, 23–24, 25, 31, 189 n.15
Arnold, Mathew, 47
Aschenbrenner, Joyce, 142, 185 n.21
Assen, Abdul, 127
“The Atlanta Conferences” (Du Bois), 55, 65
Atlanta University, 46, 186 n.33

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