The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America

By Marisa Chappell | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Reconstructing the Black Family: The
Liberal Antipoverty Coalition in the 1960s

Our men, once deliberately emasculated as the only way to enforce their
servile status, might easily be tempted by a family structure which by mak-
ing them the financial head of the household, seemed to make them its ac-
tual head. In our desperation to escape so many suffering decades, we might
trip down the worn path taken by so many in America before us.

—Eleanor Holmes Norton, 1971

In 1963, United Auto Workers (UAW) president Walter Reuther launched a “Citizens’ Crusade Against Poverty” (CCAP), an effort to harness the energies of a “unique coalition of church, civic, fraternal, labor and business groups” toward a “national issue of conscience.” That “unique coalition” was in the thick of another issue of conscience in 1963, of course— the struggle for African American civil rights. Coupled with massive civil disobedience among African Americans throughout the nation, pressure from organized liberal America would result in the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which effectively dismantled the legal framework of racial segregation in the American South, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which at long last ensured basic political rights to black Southerners. If response to Reuther’s CCAP invitation is any indication, the liberal civil rights coalition brought a similar moral energy to the issue of poverty. Liberals exhibited “overwhelming interest and support,” and by 1966, Reuther had convinced over 125 organizations to join his crusade to “eradicat[e] … poverty in our times.” With labor, religious, and foundation funding, CCAP saw itself as a civilian counterpart to the federal government’s War on Poverty, the embodiment of middle-class Americans’ “special responsibility to help those who have not been so fortunate, who have been left behind.”1

The list of individuals and organizations that responded to Reuther’s

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.