The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America

By Marisa Chappell | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Building a New Majority: Welfare and
Economic Justice in the 1970s

As we are beginning to work on the “new” issues of economic justice—on
taxes, utility rates, neighborhood preservation, etc. and with “new” con-
stituencies—the working poor, ethnic Americans, the newly awakened
middle American …—welfare recipients and welfare as an issue are not
popular. It seems safer to steer clear of welfare.

—Tim Sampson, 1974

During the 1970s, from her post at the National Social Welfare Assembly (NSWA), Elizabeth Wickenden waged a valiant campaign to keep antipoverty liberals informed about political action on welfare. Her “Washington Notes” newsletters tell a story of social services under fire and an embattled AFDC program. During the Nixon and Ford administrations, Congress and federal welfare administrators implemented many of the same restrictive features that had so offended welfare rights activists during the FAP campaign. HEW tightened eligibility requirements and limited recipients’ access to fair hearings, states found numerous ways to restrict eligibility, Congress tightened work requirements, and federal administrators gave states increasing leeway to implement “workfare” programs, in which recipients “earned” their grants by performing unpaid community-service jobs.1 At the NCSW annual forum in 1973, President Mary R. Ripley addressed welfare’s growing vulnerability. “Perhaps it is hard to think of celebrating at a time when … the very programs and philosophy that have been our cornerstone are threatened,” she noted, and “when humanitarian concerns seem to be out of style with some who hold influential positions in this, our great country.”2 Ripley captured a mood that rippled through the social welfare community, whose meetings in the mid-1970s were characterized by “gloomy reports … from all over the country,” a belief that

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.