The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America

By Marisa Chappell | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Debating the Family Wage: Welfare
Reform in the Carter Administration

The assumptions upon which the AFDC Program was founded are no
longer valid.

—National Conference on Social Welfare, 1976

In June 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Califano v. Westcottthat the federal government’s AFDC-Unemployed Parent program (AFDC-UP) violated the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. Begun as a temporary measure during the Kennedy administration, AFDCUP provided federal funds to states that wished to offer cash aid to twoparent families with an unemployed breadwinner. Though the statute language included no reference to the sex of that breadwinner, liberal reformers promoted the program as a way to keep unemployed fathers from deserting their wives and children in order to qualify them for AFDC. By the 1970s, only twenty-two states offered the program, and by 1977 AFDCUP’s 750,000 recipients made up less than 7 percent of the nation’s AFDC population.1 Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, liberal reformers consistently urged Congress to make the program mandatory. After all, AFDC-UP epitomized liberal welfare ideology: it expanded federal welfare coverage and it seemed to promote male-breadwinner families among the poor. In fact, as Chapter 2 noted, few liberals or welfare rights activists either noticed or bothered to comment when Congress officially restricted the program to families with unemployed fathers in 1967. Over a decade later, that restriction prompted a sex discrimination lawsuit.

The force behind Califano v. Westcott was a relatively new player in federal welfare politics: organized feminism. NOW spearheaded the lawsuit, taking up the case of two Massachusetts families denied AFDC-UP benefits on the grounds that the unemployed parent was female. Cindy Westcott

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.