The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America

By Marisa Chappell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For a seemingly solitary endeavor, writing a book is in fact a social activity. It is a reminder that, contrary to the myth of “independence” so often touted during debates about federal income support, we are all dependent upon one another. I often found myself engaging more actively than I expected with the subjects of my research—at turns questioning them, arguing with them, and cheering them on. More tangibly, I relied on assistance, advice, criticism, and support from a broad group of individuals. I hope my words can, in some small measure, repay them.

I could not have completed the research stage of this work without the generosity of a number of individuals and institutions. Grants from the Hagley Museum and Library, the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe, the Social Welfare History Archive at the University of Minnesota, and Oregon State University’s Valley Library funded crucial research trips. A Northwestern University Alumnae Association Dissertation Fellowship and, later, an Oregon State University Center for the Humanities Fellowship provided vital time to write, as did generous and timely assistance from Jane Chappell and Alan and Cyndy Schreihofer. A number of friends offered lodging during my many research excursions; thanks to Elizabeth DeBray, Lise Shapiro and Eric Sanders, Anne-Marie Chang and Orfeu Buxton, and the Kolker and Kolker/Spencer family for their hospitality. The members of the History Department at Oregon State have been ideal colleagues, both intellectually and personally. I am particularly grateful to Bob Nye, Mary Jo Nye, Jeff Sklansky, and Ben Mutschler for their wise counsel and consistent encouragement. Paul Farber and Jon Katz have been exceptionally supportive chairs, going out of their way to ensure that I had the support I needed to complete this book.

As any historian knows, librarians and archivists provide the critical expertise that enables our work. Many thanks to all those who assisted me at the Library of Congress Manuscript Reading Room; the Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs at Wayne State University; The George Meany Memorial Archives; the Schlesinger Library at

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